Bitch on the Blog

July 3, 2016

Valour and to debase

Picking a few of a plethora of notable quotes in the British press:

“The leave campaign is a revolution, and like all revolutions, it will eat its own.”

Maybe, though I think evoking the French Revolution’s big players is a little far fetched in the context of British politicians turning into Pinocchios, chameleons, piranhas, Judases, downright chancers and slime.  Leaving Jo Cox (England, shot 16 June 2016) aside, no one has yet been stabbed to death in the bath (reference Marat, Paris, July 1783).

“Democrats have no duty to endorse democracy’s every outcome.”

This one I love.  It’s an epiphany. Whoever wrote it I could kiss. Think about it: “Democrats have no duty to ENDORSE democracy’s EVERY outcome.”  Genius.

And then there is, the relatively harmless:

“People want to be lied to, Johnson. No, not Boris, 2016, who proved the point; the other one, Samuel, ca mid 17 hundreds, who made an observation.

I have a special relationship with lies/lying. I do concede that a white lie, in order to avert unnecessary harm and judiciously applied, does have its place in social relations. The blatant lie, the misleading, the blinding, the up and down the garden paths, the self serving, the coward’s way out? No. Not in my court. Which is not the same as saying that I don’t understand those who are trapped in a corner and make deals with the devil. It happens. And let no one cast the first or any stone.

Premeditated lying? There is no excuse for it. Even the most optimistic, “well meaning” and accomplished liar will have to accept that trust – once broken – is just that: Broken. Or in the words of Bertold Brecht, loosely translated: “The ends of a knot severed can be spliced together again but you won’t find me where you left me”. In other words: Rain doesn’t return whence it came from.

U

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3 Comments »

  1. It seems to me that the best lie consists of information that is 100% true: “Everyone who has invested in our project has experienced an excellent return on their money”. My understanding is that they are technically “white lies”, but will need to wait for an expert to weigh in.

    As for Faust, it seems to me that he came out relatively well compared to the Greeks.

    Comment by Looney — July 3, 2016 @ 14:33 | Reply

    • And then, Looney, there is “the lie by omission”. It’s where we veer off black and white and wander into the moral maze of “grey/gray”. In other words, if one doesn’t ask you the question you don’t have to volunteer the answer. Yes, I know it’s wobbly ground, and the thin veneer of the ice you are walking on does creek, yet … I do believe there are times when it’s best to keep your mouth shut.

      Which is why I pity anyone bound by the Catholic Church, going to confession. Three hundred Hail Maries later you are still the same swine but at least your priest (in the name of Father, Son and Holy Ghost) has forgiven you for your sins. Till next time. As an aside, and no disrespect intended, it must be marvellous to be a priest taking confessions. Why priests aren’t fiction writers is beyond me. The material, real life drama related to you by an anguished soul the other side of the panel – can you imagine it?

      As to your assertion re Faust and the Greeks. Not so sure. Will put this to my father. That’ll cost me another hour of my life and will be most illuminating. On instinct I think there is a huge difference between the suffering of a single soul and that of a collective.

      U

      Comment by bitchontheblog — July 3, 2016 @ 17:01 | Reply

      • Just asked my friend who was raised Catholic. He says he confessed after every Friday outing with his friends to eating a hamburger, which was the source of anguish in his soul at the time. This being the Bay Area, rumor has it that confessions are more about eating Foie Gras. Too bad I don’t have any Catholic priests among my friends.

        Comment by Looney — July 3, 2016 @ 20:47 | Reply


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