Bitch on the Blog

October 10, 2016

Check, Mate

One of the joys of a language being your second is that you give meaning to words and phrases only you understand.

Let’s leave aside my coquettish, and for years, saying “prawn to something” instead of prone. You have to be a foreigner to enjoy that little play. British humour aside, they don’t get it.

Anyway, I grew up – yesterday – and now know how not to be stupid beyond my capabilities.

U

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11 Comments »

  1. I am very happy for you. How is that for British kind of humour?

    Comment by rummuser — October 10, 2016 @ 15:01 | Reply

  2. It sounds like you had an epiphany. How exciting! 🙂

    Comment by Cheerful Monk — October 10, 2016 @ 16:52 | Reply

    • An “epiphany”? Jean, sometimes you sound like a puppy. Nothing “exciting” to get your tail round here.

      U

      Comment by bitchontheblog — October 10, 2016 @ 17:22 | Reply

    • That’s too bad. I love my epiphanies and was hoping you experienced one too. And yes, I am a puppy at heart.

      Tail wags. 🙂

      Comment by Cheerful Monk — October 10, 2016 @ 18:11 | Reply

      • You are right. Epiphanies are great. And exhausting. I wish I had them more often. Instead of which, and you may relate to this too, life chips away little by little, drip drip drip. Till the penny drops. Or, in my case, a wad of cash gets lost. I can’t tell you how close I feel to Sisyphus and his efforts. Though will hasten to add that, unlike him, I am not given to deceit. Deceit? The gods in those days, Olympian heights, are fine ones to talk. If ever anyone was given to be deceitful it was them. Not least Zeus. The Swine.

        U

        Comment by bitchontheblog — October 11, 2016 @ 08:52 | Reply

  3. Slang or local language – can be entertaining as well… some words in NZ can differ between the islands as well – springing to mind the season for going to your bach or crib for a holiday…

    Comment by cedar51 — October 10, 2016 @ 19:08 | Reply

  4. I give strange meanings to words and phrases even in my own language. They have associations peculiar to my own life that nobody else would understand.

    Comment by nick — October 10, 2016 @ 21:58 | Reply

  5. “prawn to something”… I like it…. This whole subject is an extension of the way that children will so often come out with their own words whilst they are learning to speak….. there was a recent programme about this on Radio 4… and both times I have missed most of the programme for some reason….. they seem to have been fixated with “suggestive” biscuits… a name that my father gave to the particular bisuit/cookie when I was young…..
    Any way these words and misporonounciations often become a family affair…… and are amusing… if not always interesting.

    Have you actually managed to define British Humour BTW? It takes some defining if it is at all definable.

    Comment by magpie11 — October 11, 2016 @ 13:42 | Reply

  6. Hi U,
    You certainly caught my attention when you gently chastised Rachel on dear John’s blog a few days ago. I appreciate your style.
    Unfortunately, I’m still occasionally capable of being stupid although my feet don’t get wet in that puddle very often.
    Cheers!
    A.K.

    Comment by A.K. — October 12, 2016 @ 03:53 | Reply

  7. I get stuck on dumb more often than I’d care to admit. Sometimes it is fun, usually it is a bit embarrassing but never is it dull. I have had to virtually relearn English since I moved to North Carolina. And rhat was just going from one end of the bible belt to another.

    Comment by shackman — October 14, 2016 @ 19:08 | Reply


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